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Temer's Congressional support is dwindling

Michel Temer's government has lost ground in Congress and it doesn’t seem to be able to  pass any strategic bill until the end of his mandate on 31 December.

Importante: os comentários e opiniões contidos neste texto são responsabilidade do autor e não necessariamente refletem a opinião do InfoMoney ou de seus controladores.

Michel Temer
(Beto Barata/PR)

Erich Decat / Brasília

Michel Temer's government has lost ground in Congress and it doesn’t seem to be able to  pass any strategic bill until the end of his mandate on 31 December.

In fact, the writing for Temer’s decreasing coalition support was on the wall in February when the ruling parties did not back the social security reform bill. Since then the government has not been able to gather a majority in the Congress to vote through any structural economic proposals.

One of them is the privatization of Electobras, the major government-owned electricity utility company. On the list, there is also the tax reform, the labor reform and the bill that removes the payroll tax cut.

Part of the current withdrawal of coalition support is directly associated with the election that takes place in October. The lawmakers are not willing to vote on any unpopular proposals that can only have fiscal effect in 2019, when a new president takes the office.

They just want to vote on the bills that can increase the possibility of electoral returns.

Besides this, another problem  for the current government is the fact that the lawmakers don't want to be identified with Temer's image and programs. According to the last poll, only 5% of Brazilians support the current government.

Which are the forecasts for the next months?

A look at the electoral calendar tells us that the government’s troubles might increase because the presidential campaign will start in early July.

It means that  Temer's government has almost two months to try to overcome the Congressional deadlocks and step forward.

After the presidential election, when the congressmen return to their regular duties  anything could be voted through. The focus will be  on the next president's program.

 

Proofread by Akos Gerold

Importante: os comentários e opiniões contidos neste texto são responsabilidade do autor e não necessariamente refletem a opinião do InfoMoney ou de seus controladores.

 

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Erich Decat

atua há 10 anos na cobertura política diária em Brasília, passando por veículos como Blog do Noblat/OGlobo, Correio Brasiliense, Folha de S.Paulo. De 2013 até 2017 trabalhou na editoria de política do Jornal Estado de S.Paulo. erich.decat@xpi.com.br

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Paulo Gama

Trabalhou 8 anos na editoria de política da Folha de S.Paulo. sendo 4 anos na coluna Painel. Venceu o Prêmio Folha de Reportagem em 2016 com série que mostrou atuação de ministro de Michel Temer em defesa de interesses privados no governo. paulo.gama@xpi.com.br

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Richard Back

Analista político da XP Investimentos. Atua na área política desde 2004, com nove anos em Brasília. Nos últimos cinco anos passou pela assessoria de importantes lideranças partidárias na Câmara dos Deputados. richard.back@gmail.com

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Victor Scalet

Faz análise de política com enfoque quantitativo na XP investimentos. Foi economista na BNP Paribas Asset Management por 6 anos. É mestre em economia pelo INSPER e atualmente cursa doutorado.

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